An Invitation to the Miraculous

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Some people live in joyful anticipation of the miraculous, mysterious, and bountiful opportunities life has to offer. For these people, wondrous circumstances seem to continually appear and reveal themselves, often heralding the appearance of wonderful opportunities and unexpected pleasures. Do you ever wonder how people come to locate and live in that emotional space?   And wouldn’t you like to be among them?

The key to living a miraculous life is staying wide open, ready for miracles to occur. People who live lives of great grace have mastered the art of inviting miracles into their lives–and making space for them when they appear.

Miracles are all around us, and we experience them every day. The human body, in all its complexity, is a miracle in itself. Crocuses that push their way through frozen ground to herald the arrival of spring are a marvel. Babies are geniuses, programmed to grow and learn at an extraordinary rate. The sun, the moon, the oxygen we breathe, and the way in which we breathe it, without thinking, without trying, are all miracles we take for granted. And the most miraculous of all? Our hearts, our thoughts, our emotions, and our ability to know them, experience them, and mold them.

People who live mindfully and allow themselves to experience the wonder of seemingly “ordinary” miracles are likely to be grateful and attuned to the goodness in their own lives. These people live in a state of anticipating magic. And that is the key: if we anticipate and expect magic and miracles, they will find us. They are already on their way.

Cultivating gratitude is critical if we are to invite the miraculous into our lives. When we are grateful for the things we already have, we are encouraging the Universe to send us more. We become more open to seeing subtle possibilities and opportunities all around us. A state of being thankful is a state of being open—and being open is, in itself, a state of grace.

Do you want more magic in your life? You can encourage the magical, and it isn’t difficult to do. Notice and acknowledge all the goodness in your life right now, and take a moment to be fully grateful. Appreciation and gratitude open the chambers of our heart- and create space for more goodness. The heart thrives on optimism, wonder, and growth. Our capacity for personal growth is, in itself, a miracle, and the human propensity towards growth is unending. We are all heading somewhere—and doing so with an open heart and mind, expecting the extraordinary, seems both efficient and practical.

In every moment of our lives we are consciously or unconsciously making choices. When we choose to see the dark side of a situation, we are shutting off our own creative energies. In choosing a gloomy interpretation of events we are not making room for the ecstatically unexpected to occur. When we choose to take a loving and forward thinking approach to our lives, we are supporting growth and happiness, and are thus choosing the wonder of possibility.

Choosing to see and believe in the miraculous, even when it seems impossible, is an act of faith in yourself and in the world around you. Faith in the world and all its mysteries is ultimately what guides us all, whether we are aware of it or not. The earth spins on its axis, the oceans do not slide off its surface, and gravity keeps us grounded. It is all a miracle, and we are all part of it. Harness its power; notice the wondrous and graciously invite it into your heart, mind, and spirit. And be ready, for good things are on their way!

 

 

 

About Allison B. Friedman

Allison B. Friedman, known to her friends as Allie, submitted her first manuscript to Doubleday when she was five years old. Sadly, it was rejected, but she did receive a personal note from an editor encouraging her to keep writing—so she did. Writing, like breathing, is essential for Allie, who has joyfully produced award-winning short fiction, prose poetry, years and years of newspaper and magazine columns, and original content for a weekly radio show called “The Therapy Sisters.” Allie’s work has been featured in a number of small literary presses, including the literary journal Beanskeeper, and she was a winner of the Poughkeepsie Journal’s “Tailspinners” short story contest. An active member of the Wallkill Valley Writers community, Allie has published her work in the group’s anthology. Her short story, “Sahara Affair,” was born in the Wallkill Valley Writers Workshop, and was published in 2013’s award-winning anthology, “Slant of Light: Contemporary Women Writers of the Hudson Valley.” A practicing psychotherapist, Allie wrote a newspaper column, oxymoronically entitled “Understanding Adolescence” and a monthly column about wellness in “Living and Being” magazine for a number of years. The voyeuristic observation of the intricacies of the human experience is endlessly fascinating to her. She has been a frequent contributor to a number of professional websites, including the Parent Resource Network, where Allie served as a staff writer and was on-call for the website’s “Ask the Expert” feature. Allie was honored to deliver a keynote address at the annual conference of the National Association of Social Workers on the subject of utilizing creativity in social work practice. Allie’s love of writing led to the creation of a therapeutic writing curriculum, which has been well received by her clients. Allie lives in New Paltz, NY with her wonderful husband and, at any given moment, some or all of their collective seven children. She wouldn’t know an empty nest if she was sitting in one. Current projects include a the completion of a novel which she swears will not defeat her, building a blog, and spending as much time as possible with her newly minted granddaughter!

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